We are not students of some subject matter, but students of problems.

Karl Popper - Conjectures and Refutations (via clever-thom-fox)

profoundlyv:

Ruins of an imaginary world. Photo from the “Orbis Tertius” series by Adam Ryder 

profoundlyv:

Ruins of an imaginary world. Photo from the “Orbis Tertius” series by Adam Ryder 

Every solution to a problem creates new, unsolved problems.

Karl Popper (via losingmusings)

We are all alike in our infinite ignorance.

Karl Popper

(via stoweboyd)

Our knowledge can only be finite, while our ignorance must necessarily be infinite.

Karl Popper (via observando)

fripperiesandfobs:

Court dress of Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna, 1820’s
From the State Hermitage Museum via Nuvo Magazine

fripperiesandfobs:

Court dress of Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna, 1820’s

From the State Hermitage Museum via Nuvo Magazine

beatonna:

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Bhāskarāchārya

[x], [x]

Bhāskarāchārya / Bhāskara II (1114–1185) was an Indian mathematician and astronomer.

Among his many achievements are the following:

1. He was the first person to explain that when you divide by zero, the result is infinity.

2. He was also the first person to note that a positive number has two square roots - a positive and a negative one.

3. He described the principles of differential calculus 500 years before Leibniz and Newton. (He definitively came up with Rolle’s theorem half a millennium before Rolle himself.)

4. He calculated the length of the rotation of the earth around the sun to 365.2588 days - he was just off by 3 minutes.

Intriguingly, his treatise on arithmetic and geometry, Līlāvatī, is named after his daughter. He addresses her as an eager student:

Oh Līlāvatī, intelligent girl, if you understand addition and subtraction, tell me the sum of the amounts 2, 5, 32, 193, 18, 10, and 100, as well as [the remainder of] those when subtracted from 10000.” and “Fawn-eyed child Līlāvatī, tell me, how much is the number [resulting from] 135 multiplied by 12, if you understand multiplication by separate parts and by separate digits. And tell [me], beautiful one, how much is that product divided by the same multiplier?

These invocations have led some to surmise that Līlāvatī, too, was a mathematician.

Image from here: http://mathdept.ucr.edu/pdf/iwm1.pdf

Story of her introduction to math here: http://4go10tales.blogspot.co.uk/2012/06/lilavati.html

Wikipedia on Bhaskaracharya

well my math teacher never talked to me that way